News and Events
Jack Lukowitsch '16



Q&A with Jack

What was your biggest challenge with this cinemagraph project?
 
A solid chunk of my time on the project was spent making the first cinemagraph presentable. It was a challenge to hide the “flicker” that would appear when something was wrong with the transition between the end and the start of my footage, which I needed to watch some tutorials and do some experimenting to solve. The rest of the cinemagraphs were easier afterwards.
 
What did you enjoy most about the project? What motivated you to explore cinemagraphs vs. still photography?
 
I had experienced plenty of opportunities at that point to practice and experiment with still photography, and was looking to try something a bit different. There’s definitely a bizarre quality to this type of art that drew me in, and it was fun to see what can happen when still picture is combined with video. 
 
How did you choose the images?
 
My usual photography process at Marin Academy was to go for a weekend walk or drive with a camera and act on spur of the moment ideas.
 
Can you also speak to your experience in photography overall at MA? What did you value most from your experience in these classes?
 
Photography was unique for me at MA because it was mostly an out-of-class rather than in-class learning process, and the assignments were all highly flexible with different interpretations that could be brought to the table.
 
Critiques were interesting since I could hear perspectives I may not have considered, and was provided the chance to correct mistakes that I hadn’t noticed. 
Another reason the experience as a whole was rewarding was because it provided the necessary framework and encouragement to produce photography. Realistically, a bunch of high school students wouldn’t be out experimenting with visual techniques and the functions of a camera recreationally, and the class provided a skill that can definitely be applied in the future. 
 
Jenny was great too. She knew how to pull potential out of good ideas and guide students away from bad ideas.